Overview

Record of School Achievement (RoSA)

The RoSA is a ​cumulative credential​ in that it allows students to accumulate their academic
results until they leave school.
The RoSA indicates completed Stage 5 and Preliminary Stage 6 courses and grades, and participation in any
uncompleted Preliminary Stage 6 courses. It is of specific use to students leaving school prior to the HSC.
Schools are responsible for awarding each student studying and completing a Stage 6 Preliminary course a grade
(A, B, C, D or E) to represent the student’s achievement (except Life Skills courses and VET). The grade
awarded is reported on the student’s RoSA.

The Common Grade Scale

Teachers use the Common Grade Scale for Preliminary Courses to determine grades for all Board Developed and
Board Endorsed Courses. Grade descriptions are derived from the knowledge, skills and understanding which are
developed in Stage 6 syllabuses and provide a general description of typical performance at each grade level
from A to E.

The Higher School Certificate

The Higher School Certificate is awarded to:
Students who have completed the Preliminary and HSC courses in Years 11 and 12 and who have sat for
examinations in the required number of subject units and have satisfactorily completed coursework and
assessment tasks in all subjects.
Students may complete the HSC by accumulating courses over a period up to 5 years, studying fewer subjects
each year to enable them to combine study with employment, sports training, less pressure, etc. Preliminary
and HSC courses may be repeated to improve marks.
When the HSC is awarded, three components are reported separately:
1) The final examination mark. This reflects a student’s level of achievement in the examination.
2) The school’s assessment of student achievement in a course.
3) The final HSC mark for each course

Subject Choice at Masada College

In making choices, students and parents must bear in mind the importance of choosing as carefully as possible,
because changes to courses will impede the progress of the student and of other members of the class.
It must be understood clearly that while the school intends to cooperate as fully as possible on the choice of
subjects and levels of study, it is constrained by a number of guidelines, either physical, financial and
ideological. ​Therefore, the school reserves the right to determine which courses will be
offered
​. However, it does remain our intention to be as flexible as is reasonably possible.

The Senior Curriculum

The HSC provides courses that reflect the differences in students’ interests and their levels of ability.
The curriculum is organised on the basis of units of study, each unit involving 60 hours of school study time
over each of Years 11 and 12. Courses are named according to their unit value, e.g. Economics 2 Unit.
Each course is divided into Year 11 Preliminary course – 100% internally assessed and Year 12 HSC course – 50%
internally assessed and 50% HSC examination/major work.
The HSC examination is based on the Year 12 HSC component only. The Preliminary course is a prerequisite for
the HSC course.
It is the aim of Masada College to encourage students to follow a broad, general course of studies. This
consists of a minimum of 12 Units in Year 11. Students in Year 12 are permitted a greater degree of
specialisation, with a NESA prescribed minimum of 10 units. However, a ​mandatory
​requirement from the Board of Studies is that all students in both Years 11 and 12 do at least​ 2
Units of English
.
All Year 11 students will study English. Appropriate levels of English for each student are recommended by the
teachers of English. In addition, selected students in the Advanced course are able to undertake extension
work in English. ​In Year 12, 2 Units of English is a compulsory component of the HSC and
ATAR
.
Study of Mathematics is not compulsory in Years 11 and 12. Teachers recommend placement in Mathematics or
Standard Mathematics classes towards the end of Year 10.

Summary of Masada College Requirements

The following rules apply to all seniors students:
(a) Students will not be able to alter their study program ​unless there are extenuating circumstances and
then a change of program will only occur after special consideration and discussion with the Head of
Curriculum and relevant teachers.
(b) The Year 11 Preliminary course is a time for testing one’s ability to work under the academic demands of
senior courses. Entry into Year 12 is ​NOT automatic but is subject to the approval of the
Principal. Students must have a satisfactory record of attendance and application.
(c) Acceptance into a course at any level depends upon the school. If it is inappropriate for a student to
undertake a course, the school reserves the right to deny the choice.

Ancient History (2 Unit)

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions: Nil

Course Description:

The study of History helps us – as Australians and as members of the wider human community – to understand
where we have come from, why we are the way we are, and gives us an insight into how we might change things in
the future. Studying Ancient History gives students the opportunity to develop their own perspective on the
origins and influence of ideas, values and behaviours that are still relevant in their modern world.
The Ancient History course involves the study of at least two of the following areas: Egypt, Greece, Rome, or
the Near East in both the Preliminary and HSC courses.
The Preliminary course is structured for students to investigate the interaction between archaeology, modern
forensic and social science, and written history as we investigate people, groups, events institutions,
societies and historical sites. The course provides a background for students’ more specialised HSC studies.
In the HSC course students use archaeological and written evidence to investigate a common core unit, and then
one ancient society, one period and one personality.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course
Part I

  • Investigating Ancient History – The Nature of Ancient History
  • Case Studies – at least TWO from a number including, amongst others, The Tomb of Tutankhamen, The Masada
    Siege, Ancient Human Remains.

Part II

  • Ancient Periods and Societies – at least two from a list that includes, amongst others City of Rome and
    the Late Republic) and Deir-el-Medina
  • Independent Historical Investigation

HSC Course
Part I

  • Case Study – The Cities of Vesuvius (Pompeii and Herculaneum)

Part II

  • Ancient Societies – ONE from a list including Spartan Society to the Battle of Leuctra, 371BC

Part III

  • Ancient Personality in the Context of their Time – ONE personality to be studied that is closely linked
    to either the Historical Society or the Historical Period but might include the Heretic Pharaoh, Akhenaten

Part IV

  • Historical Period ONE from a list that includes New Kingdom of Egypt from Amenhotep III to Ramesses II

Biology (2 Unit)

2 units for Year 11 (Preliminary) and Year 12 (HSC) Board Developed Course.
Exclusions: ​Students can study a maximum of 6 units of Science in Year 11 and 7 units in
Year 12.

Course Description​:

The Year 11 course investigates cellular structure and provides a base for understanding the way in which
multicellular organisms transport and absorb nutrients and carry out gas exchange. Exploring variations in the
structures and functions of organisms provides an understanding of the effects of the environment on living
things and how this leads to biodiversity. The Year 12 course investigates reproduction, inheritance patterns
and the causes of genetic variation in both plants and animals. Applications of this knowledge in
biotechnology and various genetic technologies are explored in the light of their uses in the treatment,
prevention and control of infectious and non-infectious diseases.

Course Content:

Year 11
Module 1: Cells as the Basis of Life
Module 2: Organisation of Living Things
Module 3: Biological Diversity
Module 4: Ecosystem Dynamics
Year 12
Module 5: Heredity
Module 6: Genetic Change
Module 7: Infectious Disease
Module 8: Non-infectious Disease and Disorders

Course Requirements:

Students are provided with 15 hours of course time for Depth Studies in both Year 11 and Year 12. During this
time students may undertake an investigation/activity that allows for further development of one or more
scientific concepts.
A Depth Study may be one investigation/activity or a series of investigations/activities. Depth Studies may be
included in one module or across several modules.
Practical investigations are an essential part of the Year 11 and Year 12 courses an must occupy a minimum of
35 hours of course time each year.
Fieldwork is also mandated in Year 11 and is an integral part of the learning process.

Business Studies (2 Unit)

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​Nil

Course Description:

Business activity is a feature of everyone’s life. The Business Studies syllabus encompasses the theoretical
and practical aspects of business in ways students will encounter throughout their lives. It offers learning
from the planning of a small business to the management of operations, marketing, finance and human resources
in large businesses.
Contemporary business issues and case studies are embedded in the course to provide a stimulating and relevant
framework for students to apply to problems encountered in the business environment. Business Studies fosters
intellectual, social and moral development by assisting students to think critically about the role of
business and its ethical responsibilities to society.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course:

  • Nature of Business – the role and nature of business
  • Business Management – the nature and responsibilities of management
  • Business Planning – establishing and planning a small to medium enterprise

HSC Course:

  • Operations – strategies for effective operations management
  • Marketing – development and implementation of successful marketing strategies
  • Finance – financial information in the planning and management of business
  • Human Resources – human resource management and business performance

Chemistry (2 Unit)

2 units for Year 11 (Preliminary) and Year 12 (HSC) Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​Students can study a maximum of 6 units of Science in Year 11 and 7 units in
Year 12

Course Description:

The Year 11 course develops the knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to the properties and
structures of matter, the types and drivers of chemical reactions and how we measure the quantities involved
in these processes. The Year 12 course builds on the concepts introduced in Year 11 by examining particular
classes of chemicals, processes and a variety of chemical reactions which incorporate organic compounds and
acid/base equilibrium reactions. The course challenges students to apply this knowledge to the investigation
of a range of methods used in identifying and measuring quantities of chemicals which leads to an
understanding of the structure, properties and trends, of and between, classes of chemicals.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course
Module 1: Properties and Structure of Matter
Module 2: Introduction to Quantitative Chemistry
Module 3: Reactive Chemistry
Module 4: Drivers of Reactions
HSC Course
Module 5: Equilibrium and Acid Reactions
Module 6: Acid/base Reactions
Module 7: Organic Chemistry
Module 8: Applying Chemical Ideas

Course Requirements:

Students are provided with 15 hours of course time for Depth Studies in both Year 11 and Year 12. During this
time students may undertake an investigation/activity that allows for the further development of one or more
scientific concepts.
A Depth Study may be one investigation/activity or a series of investigations/activities. Depth Studies may be
included in one module or across several modules.
Practical investigations are an essential part of the Year 11 and Year 12 courses and must occupy a minimum of
35 hours of course time each year.

Classical Hebrew Continuers (2 Unit)

2 units each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed course
Prerequisites: ​200-300 hours study of the language, or equivalent

Course Description:

The language to be studied and assessed is Classical Hebrew.
Classical Hebrew has been the language of Jewish religious literature from earliest >writings to the modern
day.
The Classical Hebrew Continuers Syllabus is designed for students who, typically, will have studied Classical
Hebrew for 400-500 hours at the completion of Year 12.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course​ is structured to provide students with opportunities to read original
Classical Hebrew texts or texts in translation and to develop the skills needed to study the prescribed texts
for the HSC course.
HSC Course​ is structured to provide students with opportunities to analyse prescribed
Classical Hebrew texts or texts in translation and to develop skills

Course Requirements:

Preliminary Course​ 120 indicative hours are required to complete the course.
HSC Course​. The Preliminary course is a prerequisite; 120 indicative hours are required to
complete the course; texts and a number of themes are prescribed for study.
Prescribed Texts – Prose
All parts of the Hebrew Bible, which are in prose and not in Aramaic, are to be studied with a prescribed
commentary, where applicable. Each year this will include selections from: ​Torah, Nevi’im and Ketuvim.
Prescribed Texts – Mishna
The following texts will be studied with the prescribed commentary. Each year this will include selections
from​: Zera’im, Mo’ed and Neziqin.​
Unseen Tanakh Texts
Unseen texts will be studied for comprehension. They will be drawn from any part of the narrative texts of the
former prophets. The Aramaic sections of the Bible will be excluded. Selected passages should be read for the
plain sense of the text.

Design & Technology (2 Unit)

2 units each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​Nil

Course Description:

Students study design processes, design theory and factors in relation to design projects.
In the ​Preliminary course​ students study designing and producing which includes the completion of at least
two design projects.
In the ​HSC course​ students undertake a study of innovation and emerging technologies which includes a case
study of an innovation. They also study designing and producing which includes the completion of a Major
Design Project.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course
Designing and Producing including the study of design theory, design processes, creativity, collaborative
design, research, management, using resources, communication, manufacturing and production, computer-based
technologies, safety, evaluation, environmental issues, analysis, marketing and manipulation of materials,
tools and techniques.
HSC Course
Innovation and Emerging Technologies including a case study of innovation. The study of designing and
producing includes a Major Design Project. The project folio includes a project proposal and management,
project development and realisation, and project evaluation.

Particular course requirements:

In the Preliminary course, students must participate in hands-on practical activities.
In the HSC course, the comprehensive study of designing and producing that were studied in the Preliminary
course are synthesised and applied. This culminates in the development and realisation of a major design
project and the presentation of a case study.

Drama (2 Unit)

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​Nil

Course Description:

Drama is an art form that explores the world through enactment. It is a collaborative art form that involves
the creative interaction of individuals using a range of artistic skills. In Drama, students can investigate,
shape and symbolically represent ideas, feelings, attitudes, beliefs and their consequences.
By studying this major art form students acquire skills in interpretation, communication, performance and
critical analysis. In the critical study of drama and theatre students can recognise the collaborative
contribution of actors, directors, playwrights, designers and technicians to production. They develop an
understanding of the cultural traditions and social contexts of drama and theatre.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course:
Significant Theatre Practitioners
Preliminary Group Performance Project
Preliminary Independent Project
HSC Course:
Contemporary Australian Theatre
Studies in Drama and Theatre
Group Performance Project
Independent Project. A choice of:

  • Performance
  • Scriptwriting
  • Design
    ○ Set Design
    ○ Costume Design
    ○ Lighting Design
    ○ Promotion and Poster Design
  • Critical Analysis
    ○ Director’s Folio
    ○ Portfolio of Theatre Criticism
    ○ Applied Research Project
  • Video

Earth and Environmental Science (2 Unit)

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​Students can study a maximum of 6 units of Science in Year 11 and 7 units in
Year 12

Course Description:

T​he Year 11 course investigates compositional layers of the Earth, the origins of minerals, tectonic
movements and energy transformations that occur and includes the study of human impact on the Earth’s
resources and its surface.
The Year 12 course investigates how the processes of plate tectonics, the formation of water and the
introduction of life interact with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and climate. Investigation of
hazards, the mitigation of their effects and resource management are also considered which leads to an
understanding of the need to centralise the theme of sustainability for the long term welfare of our planet
and all forms of life dependent upon it.

Course Content:

Year 11
Module 1​ Earth’s Resources
Module 2​ Plate Tectonics
Module 3​ Energy Transformations
Module 4​ Human Impacts
Year 12
Module 5​ Earth’s Processes
Module 6 ​Hazards
Module 7 ​Climate Science
Module 8​ Resource Management

Particular Course Requirements:

Students are provided with 15 hours of course time for depth studies in both Year 11 and Year 12. During this
time students may undertake an investigation/activity that allows for the further development of one or more
scientific concepts.
A depth study may be one investigation/activity or a series of investigations/activities. Depth studies may be
included in one module or across several modules.
Practical investigations are an essential part of the Year 11 and Year 12 courses and must occupy a minimum of
35 hours of course time each year.
Fieldwork is mandated in both Year 11 and Year 12 and is an integral part of the learning process.

Economics (2 Unit)

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​Nil

Course Description:

Economics provides students with the framework to analyse how people and societies (economies) behave when
making choices about spending and saving. It investigates issues including why unemployment or inflation rates
change and how these changes will impact on society. Economics develops students’ knowledge and understanding
of the operation of the global and Australian economies. It develops the analytical, problem solving and
communication skills of students. There is a strong emphasis on the problems and issues in a contemporary
Australian economic context within the course.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course

  • Introduction to Economics
  • Consumers and Business
  • Markets
  • Labour Markets
  • Financial Markets
  • Government in the Economy

HSC Course

  • The Global Economy
  • Australia’s Place in the Global Economy
  • Economic Issues
  • Economic Policies and Management

English Standard

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions:​ English Advanced; English as an Additional Language or Dialect; English
Extension

Course Description:

In the ​Preliminary English Standard​ course students explore the ways events, experiences,
ideas and processes are represented in and through texts.
In the ​HSC English Standard course​ students reflect on and demonstrate the effectiveness of
texts for different audiences and purposes.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course
The course has three sections:

  • Common Module- Reading to Write: Transition to Senior English. Students explore texts and develop skills
    in responding and composing texts.
  • Module A: Contemporary Possibilities
  • Module B: Close Study of Literature

HSC Course
The course has four sections:

  • Common Module- Texts and Human Experiences
  • Module A: Language, Identity and Culture
  • Module B: Close Study of Literature
  • Module C: The Craft of Writing

Modules emphasise particular aspects of shaping meaning and demonstration of the effectiveness of texts for
different audiences and purposes.

Particular course requirements:

In the​ Preliminary English (Standard) Course​ students are required to:

  • Study Australian and other texts
  • Explore a range of types of text drawn from prose fiction, drama, poetry, non-fiction, film, media
    and/or multimedia texts.
  • Undertake wide reading programs involving texts and textual forms composed in and for a wide variety of
    contexts
  • Integrate the modes of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing as appropriate
  • Engage in the integrated study of language and text.

The​ HSC English (Standard) Course​ requires:

  • The close study of at least ​three​ types of prescribed texts: prose fiction; drama or poetry;
    non-fiction or film or media.
  • A wide range of additional related texts and textual forms.

English Advanced

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​English Standard, Fundamentals of English; English EAL/D

Course Description:

In the ​Preliminary English (Advanced) course​ students explore the ways events, experiences, ideas, values
and processes are represented in and through texts and analyse the ways in which texts reflect different
attitudes and values.
In the ​HSC English (Advanced) course​ students analyse and evaluate texts and the ways they are valued in
their contexts.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course:
The course has three sections:

  • Common Module- Reading to Write: Transition to Senior English . Students explore texts and develop
    skills in responding and composing texts.
  • Module A: Narratives that Shape our World
  • Module B: Critical Study of Literature

HSC Course
The course has four sections:

  • Common Module – Texts and Human Experiences
  • Module A: Textual Conversations
  • Module B: Critical Study of Literature
  • Module C: The Craft of Writing
  • Modules emphasise particular aspects of shaping meaning and representation, questions of textual
    integrity, and ways in which texts are valued.

Particular course requirements:

Preliminary English (Advanced) Course​ requires:

  • Study texts which are widely regarded as quality literature including texts which draw upon a range of
    cultural, social and gender perspectives
  • Explore a range of types of text drawn from prose fiction, drama, poetry, non-fiction, film, media
    and/or multimedia texts.
  • Undertake wide reading programs involving texts and textual forms composed in and for a wide variety of
    contexts
  • Integrate the modes of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing as appropriate
  • Engage in the integrated study of language and text.

HSC English (Advanced) Course​ requires:

  • The close study of at least ​four ​types of prescribed text, one drawn from each of the following
    categories: Shakespearean drama; prose fiction; drama ​or poetry.The remaining text may be film, media or
    nonfiction text ​or​ may be selected from one of the categories above.
  • A wide range of additional related texts and textual forms.

Preliminary English Extension (Ext 1, Ext 2)

1 unit of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Prerequisites/Corequisites:
a) English (Advanced) course
b) Preliminary English Extension Course is prerequisite for HSC Extension 1
c) Extension 1 is a corequisite of English (Advanced)
d) Extension 1 is a prerequisite for Extension
Exclusions:​ English (Standard) course; Fundamentals of English; EAL/D

Course Description:

  • In the ​Preliminary English (Extension)​ course students explore how and why texts are
    valued in and appropriated into a range of contexts. They consider who some texts may be perceived as
    culturally significant.
  • In ​HSC English (Extension) 1​ students explore ideas of value and consider how
    cultural values and systems of valuation arise.
  • In ​HSC English (Extension) 2​, students develop a sustained composition and document
    their reflection on this process.

Course Content:

Preliminary Extension Course
The course has one mandatory section: Texts, Culture and Value. Students also complete a related research
project.
HSC Extension Course 1
The course has two sections:
Common Module: Literary Worlds and an elective chosen from Literary Homelands;Worlds of Upheaval; Reimagined
Worlds; Literary Mindscapes; Intersecting Worlds.
HSC Extension Course 2
The course requires students to complete a Major Work.

Particular course requirements:

Preliminary English (Extension) ​course requires students to examine a key text from the past
and its manifestations in one or more recent cultures. Students also explore, analyse and critically evaluate
different examples of such appropriations in a range of contexts and media.
The HSC English (Extension) 1​ course requires the study of prescribed texts. The study of at
least ​THREE ​texts must be selected from a prescribed text list for the module study
including at least ​TWO​ extended print texts. Students are required to study at least
TWO​ related texts.
The HSC English (Extension) 2​ course requires completion of a Major Work proposal, a
statement of reflection and the Major Work for submission.

English as an Additional Language or Dialect (EAL/D)

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​English Advanced, bFundamentals of English; English Standard
The English EAL/D course may be accessed by any student who has been educated overseas or in an Australian
educational institution using English as the language of instruction for five years or less prior to the
beginning of the Preliminary year of study.

Course Description:

In the ​Preliminary English EAL/D ​course students read, write, view, speak and listen to a
wide variety of texts in order to enhance their acquisition of the English language.
In the ​HSC English EAL/D ​course students develop and refine their understanding of English
in all modes and study a variety of different texts.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course:
The course has three compulsory sections:

  • Module A: Language and Texts in Context
  • Module B: Close Study of Text
  • Module C: Texts and Society
  • Optional Teacher Developed Module

HSC Course:
The Course has four sections:

  • Module A: Texts and Human Experiences
  • Module B: Language, Identity and Culture
  • Module C: Close Study of Text
  • Focus on Writing (studied concurrently with the above modules).

Particular Course Requirements

  • Study Australian and other texts
  • Explore a range of types of text drawn from prose fiction, drama, poetry, non-fiction, film, media
    and/or multimedia texts.
  • Undertake wide reading programs involving texts and textual forms composed in and for a wide variety of
    contexts
  • Integrate the modes of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing as appropriate
  • Engage in the integrated study of language and text.

Food Technology (2 Unit)

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​Nil

Course Description:

Students will develop knowledge and understanding about the production, processing and consumption of food,
the nature of food and human nutrition and an appreciation of the importance of food to health and its impact
on society. Skills will be developed in researching, analysing and communicating food issues, food
preparation, and the design, implementation and evaluation of solutions to food situations.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course

  • Food Availability and Selection
  • Food Quality
  • Nutrition

HSC Course

  • The Australian Food Industry
  • Food Manufacture
  • Food Product Development
  • Contemporary Nutrition Issues

Particular course requirements:

  • There is no prerequisite study for the 2 unit Preliminary course. Completion of the 2 unit Preliminary
    course is a prerequisite to the study of the 2 unit HSC course.
  • In order to meet the course requirements students must learn about food availability and selection, food
    quality, nutrition, the Australian Food Industry, Food Manufacture, Food Product Development and
    Contemporary Nutrition Issues.
  • It is a mandatory requirement that students undertake practical activities. Such experiential learning
    activities are specified in the ‘learning to’ section of each strand.

Geography (2 Unit)

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​Nil

Course Description:

The Preliminary course investigates biophysical and human geography and develops students’ knowledge and
understanding about the spatial and ecological dimensions of geography. Enquiry methodologies are used to
investigate the unique characteristics of our world through fieldwork, geographical skills and the study of
contemporary geographical issues.
The HSC course enables students to appreciate geographical perspectives about the contemporary world. There
are specific studies about biophysical and human processes, interactions and trends. Fieldwork and a variety
of case studies combined with an assessment of the geographers’ contribution to understanding our environment
and demonstrates the relevance of geographical study.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course

  • Biophysical Interactions – how biophysical processes contribute to sustainable management.
  • Global Challenges – geographical study of issues at a global scale: Population and Development Geography
  • Senior Geography Project – a geographical study of student’s own choosing based on primary and secondary
    research.

HSC Course

  • Ecosystems at Risk – the functioning of ecosystems (Coral Reefs and Coastal Dunes), their management and
    protection.
  • Urban Places – study of cities and urban dynamics: World Cities, Mega Cities, Urban Dynamics and a study
    of a large developed city (Sydney)
  • People and Economic Activity – geographic study of economic activity in a local and global context:
    tourism on a global scale, and Perisher ski resort on a local scale.

Particular Course Requirements:

Students complete a Senior Geography Project (SGP) in the Preliminary course and will undertake at least 12
hours of fieldwork in both the Preliminary and HSC courses.

Hospitality (2 Unit Category B Industry Curriculum Framework) – Certificate II in Hospitality
(SIT20316)

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Prerequisites:​ Nil
Exclusions: ​Hospitality Certificate I (120 hours)
Course Description:
This course is for students who wish to work in the hospitality industry, either as a long term career or in
part time or temporary hospitality positions.
The course is based on units of competency which have been drawn up by the hospitality industry to describe
the competencies, skills and knowledge needed by workers in this industry.
This course incorporates eight core units plus a range of units from various functional areas. At Masada
College we focus on Food and Beverage for its post-school employment opportunities.
Course Content:
The Core Units of the course concentrates on students developing skills to work effectively in a hospitality
environment. This includes hospitality industry awareness, communication with customers and staff, working
safely and hygienically and operating equipment.
The following units of work make up the Core Competencies:

  • BSBWOR203 – Work effectively with others
  • SITHIND002 – Source and use information on the hospitality industry
  • SITXFSA001 – Use hygienic practices for work safety
  • SITXWHS001 – Participate in safe work practices

The following units of work make up the Food and Beverage stream units:

  • SITHFAB004 – Prepare and serve non-alcoholic beverages
  • SITHFAB005 – Prepare and serve espresso coffee
  • SITHFAB007 – Serve food and beverage
  • SITXCCS003 – Interact with customers

Particular Course Requirements:
Work placement: students must complete a minimum of 70 hours mandatory workplacement in an appropriate work
environment.
Assessment:
Competency Assessment
This is a competency-based course. This means that students work to develop the competencies, skills and
knowledge described in each Unit of Competency. To be assessed as competent a student must demonstrate to a
qualified assessor that they can effectively carry out the various tasks and combinations of tasks listed to
the standard required in the appropriate industry. There is no mark awarded in competency-based assessments.
Students are assessed as either ‘achieved’ or ‘not yet achieved’. Students will be progressively assessed
throughout the course in the individual units of competency. When a student achieves a unit of competency it
is signed off by the assessor. Competency based assessment determines the vocational qualification that a
student will receive.
External Assessment – HSC Examination
The Higher School Certificate examination for Hospitality (240 indicative hours) will involve a written
examination made up of multiple-choice items, short answers and extended response items. The questions will be
drawn from Units of Competency and HSC Requirements and Advice shown in the syllabus. The examination is
independent of the competency-based assessment undertaken during the course and has no impact on the
eligibility of a student to receive AQF qualifications.
Qualifications:

  • Students who are assessed as competent (through integrated competency assessment) in all of the Units of
    Competency in Hospitality (240 hours) will be eligible for the AQF Certificate II in Hospitality SIT20316.
  • Students who are assessed as competent (through integrated competency assessment) in all of the Units of
    Competency in Hospitality (120 hours) will be eligible for the AQF Certificate I in Hospitality SIT20316.
  • Students who are assessed as competent for some Units of Competency will be eligible for a Statement of
    Attainment showing partial completion of Certificate I or II.

Mathematics Standard (2 Unit)

2 Units of Year 11 Mathematics Standard and 2 units of Year 12 Mathematics Standard 2 Board Developed Course

Prerequisites:

The course is constructed on the assumption that students have engaged with all the sub strands in Stage 5.1
Mathematics and the following sub strands from Stage 5.2 Mathematics – area and surface area, financial
mathematics, linear relationships, non-linear relationships, right-angled triangles (trigonometry), single
variable data analysis, volume, equations and probability. Students who have only completed the Stage 5.1 sub
strands will find this course difficult.

Course Description:

The Mathematics Standard 2 course is designed for those students who want to extend their mathematical skills
beyond Stage 5 but are not seeking the in-depth knowledge of higher mathematics that the study of calculus
would provide. This course offers students the opportunity to prepare for a wide range of educational and
employment aspirations, including continuing their studies at a tertiary level.

Course Content:

Year 11 Course

  • Algebra – Formulae and Equations & Linear Relationships
  • Measurement – Applications of Measurement & Working with Time
  • Financial Mathematics – Money Matters
  • Statistical Analysis – Data Analysis & Relative Frequency and Probability

Year 12 Course Standard 2

  • Algebra – Types of relationships
  • Measurement – Non-Right angled trigonometry
  • Financial Mathematics – Investments and Loans & Rates and Ratio
  • Networks – Network Concepts & Critical Path Analysis

Mathematics Advanced (2 Unit)

2 units of each of Year 11 and 12 Mathematics Advanced. Board Developed Course

Prerequisites:

The course is constructed on the assumption that students have achieved the outcomes in the Stage 5.1,5.2 and
5.3 Mathematics Course. Students need to be proficient in algebra, quadratic equations, coordinate geometry,
plane geometry, non-linear relationships and trigonometry.

Course Description:

This course is intended to give students who have demonstrated general competence in the skills of Stage 5.2
and 5.3 Mathematics, an understanding of and competence in some further aspects of mathematics which are
applicable to the real world. It includes a large calculus component and its applications which relies heavily
on a good understanding of algebra. The course is useful for concurrent studies in commerce and science. It
would form a sufficient basis for further studies in mathematics as a minor discipline and would assist in
future studies and careers in STEM, finance, business and technology.

Course Content:

Year 11 Course

  • Functions: Working with Functions
  • Trigonometric Functions: Trigonometry and Measure of Angles & Trigonometric Functions and Identities
  • Calculus: Introduction to Calculus
  • Exponential and Logarithmic Functions: Logarithms and Exponentials
  • Statistical Analysis: Probability and Discrete Probability Distributions

Year 12 Course

  • Functions: Graphing Techniques
  • Trigonometric Functions: Trigonometric Functions and Graphs
  • Calculus: Differential Calculus, The Second Derivative & Integral Calculus
  • Statistical Analysis: Descriptive Statistics and Bivariate Data Analysis & Random Variables

Mathematics Extension 1 (1 Unit)

1 unit of each of Year 11 and 12 of Extension 1 Board Developed Course
Prerequisites: ​The course is constructed on the assumption that students have achieved the
outcomes in the Stage 5.2 – 5.3 Mathematics course along with those optional topics recommended for students
who intend to study the Extension 1 course.
Co-requisite:​ Students must study the Mathematics Advanced course to be eligible for
Extension 1.

Course Description:

The content of this course, which is studied with the Advanced course, and its depth of treatment indicate
that it is intended for students who have demonstrated a mastery of the skills of Stage 5 Mathematics and who
are interested in the study of further skills and ideas in mathematics. The course is intended to give these
students a thorough understanding of and competence in aspects of mathematics including many which are
applicable to the real world. It has general educational merit and is also useful for concurrent studies of
science, industrial arts, economics and commerce. The course is a recommended minimum basis for further
studies in mathematics as a major discipline at a tertiary level, and for the study of mathematics in support
of the physical and engineering sciences. Although the Extension 1 course is sufficient for these purposes,
students of outstanding mathematical ability should consider undertaking the Extension 2 course during their
HSC year.

Course Content:

Year 11 Course

  • Functions: Further Work with Functions & Polynomials
  • Trigonometric Functions: Inverse Trigonometric Functions & Further Trigonometric Identities
  • Calculus: Rates of Change
  • Combinatorics: Working with Combinatorics.

Year 12 Course:

  • Proof: Proof by Mathematical Induction
  • Vectors: Introduction to Vectors
  • Trigonometric Functions: Trigonometric Equations
  • Calculus: Further Calculus Skills & Applications of Calculus
  • Statistical Analysis: The Binomial Distribution

Modern Hebrew Continuers (2 Unit)

2 units for each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed course – 240 hours
Prerequisites: ​ 200 Hours of Study
Exclusions:​ Nil

Course Structure:

The Preliminary course (120 indicative hours) has, as its organisational focus, themes and associated topics.
Students’ skills in, and knowledge and understanding of, Modern Hebrew will be developed through tasks
associated with a range of texts and text types that reflect the themes and topics. Students will also gain an
insight into the culture and the language of Hebrew-speaking communities through the study of a range of
texts.
The HSC Course (120 indicative hours) focuses on the three prescribed themes and associated topics. Students
will gain a broader and deeper understanding of Modern Hebrew and will extend and refine their communication
skills in the language. As they expand the range of tasks, texts and text types studied students’ knowledge
and understanding of the culture and the language of Hebrew-speaking communities will develop further.

Course Content:

Year 11
The individual

  • Personal identity
    ○ adolescence
    ○ family
    ○ home and community
    ○ significant events
  • Leisure and lifestyles
    ○ keeping healthy
    ○ hobbies
    ○ daily routine
    ○ sport
    ○ youth
  • Education & future aspirations
    ○ school
    ○ future plans

Year 12
The Hebrew speaking communities

  • Art and entertainment
    ○ music and song
    ○ art
    ○ theatre/literature
    ○ film
  • Current & historical perspectives
    ○ religious and national celebrations
    ○ establishment of the State of Israel
  • Ways of Life in Israel
    ○ kibbutz
    ○ army
    ○ new and old places

Year 12
The changing world

  • The world of work
    ○ careers and occupations
    ○ technology
    ○ trading in Israel
  • Social issues
    ○ drugs
    ○ equity
    ○ unemployment
    ○ science and innovation

Students are encouraged to use dictionaries during their examinations.

Course Requirements:

Preliminary Course:​ 120 indicative hours are required to complete the course.
HSC Course:​ the Preliminary course is a prerequisite; 120 indicative hours are required to
complete the course; themes and topics are prescribed for study.

Modern History (2 Unit)

2 units for each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​Nil

Course Description:

The Preliminary Course provides students with opportunities to develop and apply their understanding of
methods and issues involved in the investigation of Modern History including people, ideas, events and
developments. The HSC Course provides students with opportunities to apply their understanding of sources and
relevant historiographical issues in the investigation of the modern world.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course
1) The Nature of Modern History
2) Case Studies

  • The American Civil War
  • The Decline and Fall of the Romanov Dynasty
  • The Cuban Revolution

3) The Shaping of the Modern World: World War I
4) Historical Investigation – A student personal interest project
HSC Course
The course comprises of four sections:
1) Core Study: Power and Authority in the Modern World 1919-1946

  • The rise of dictatorships after World War One
  • Germany and the Nazi regime to 1939
  • Search for peace and security in the world

2) National Studies: Russia and the Soviet Union 1917 – 1941
3) Peace and Conflict: Conflict in Indochina 1954-1979
4) Change in the Modern World: The Nuclear Age 1945 – 2011

Music 1 (2 Unit)

Prerequisites: ​Nil
Exclusions:​ Music 2, Music Extension
2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course

Course Description:

The Preliminary course explores the concepts of music through musical activities of performing, composing,
listening and analysing. In the Preliminary and HSC courses students learn about music at a level suited to
their experience and interest. They learn the concepts of music through experiences in performance,
composition, musicology and aural, within the context of a range of styles, periods and genres. Computer
technology for composition and sound editing is integral to the course as appropriate.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course​: Music Technology, Music for Small Ensembles (Preliminary)
HSC Course​: An Instrument and its Repertoire, Music of the 20​th & 21​st Centuries, Own
Choice from Syllabus

Particular Course Requirements:

HSC Course: In addition to core studies and activity in performance, composition, musicology
and aural skills, students specialise in THREE electives through their selection of any combination of
performance, composition and musicology which best suit their interests, abilities and learning style. These
electives must represent EACH of the three topics studied in the course.
Students selecting Composition electives compile a portfolio of work as part of the process of preparing a
submitted 4-minute work. Musicology electives involve research and making oral and audio-visual presentations
about chosen topics for a 10-minute discussion. Performance electives study an instrument or voice and become
involved in producing and performing in a range of performance activities throughout their course.

Music 2 (2 Unit)

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Prerequisites: ​Music Additional Study Course (Yr 9/10 Music elective or equivalent)
Exclusions: ​Music 1

Course Description:

In the Preliminary and HSC courses, students will study the concepts of music through experiences in
performance, composition, musicology and aural within the context of a range of styles, periods and genres. In
Music 2 students learn to read a range of scores, how to transpose, read different clefs and look at emerging
techniques in art music.

Course Content:

Students study one Mandatory Topic covering a range of musical styles and genres, and one Additional Topic in
each year of the course. In the Preliminary course the Mandatory Topic is Music 1600–1900, and the Additional
Topic is Australian Music. In the HSC course the Mandatory Topic is Music of the last 25 Years (Australian
Focus) with a choice of Additional Topics from the syllabus outcomes, appropriate to the interests and
specialisation of the candidate.

Particular Course Requirements:

In addition to core studies in performance, composition, musicology and aural, students nominate ONE elective
study in Performance, Composition or Musicology in the HSC. Year Students selecting Composition or Musicology
electives compile a portfolio of work as part of the process of preparing a submitted work. All students
develop a composition portfolio for the core composition (2 minutes) as well as prepare a core performance of
5 minutes or under.

PD/Health/PE (2 Unit)

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​Nil

Course Description:

The Preliminary course examines a range of areas that underpin health and physical activity. This includes how
people think about health and physical activity, the management of personal health and the basis for how the
body moves. Students have the opportunity to select from a range of practical options in areas such as first
aid, outdoor recreation, composing and performing and fitness choices.
In the HSC course students focus on major issues related to Australia’s health status. They also look at
factors that affect physical performance. They undertake optional study from a range of choices. This includes
investigating the health of young people or of groups experiencing health inequities. In other options
students focus on improved performance and safe participation by learning about advanced approaches to
training or sports medicine concepts. There is also an opportunity to think critically about the factors that
impact on sport and physical activity in Australian society.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course
Core Topics

  • Better Health for Individuals
  • The Body in Motion

Optional Components
Students to select two options each from

  • First Aid
  • Composition and Performance
  • Fitness Choices
  • Outdoor Recreation

HSC Course
Core Topics

  • Health Priorities in Australia
  • Factors Affecting Performance

Optional Component
Students to select two options each from

  • The Health of Young People
  • Sport and Physical Activity in Australian Society
  • Sports Medicine
  • Improving Performance
  • Equity and Health

Particular course requirements:

In addition to core studies students select two options in each of the Preliminary and HSC courses.

Physics (2 Unit)

2 units for Year 11 (Preliminary) and Year 12 (HSC) Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​Students can study a maximum of 6 units of Science in Year 11 and 7 units in
Year 12.

Course Description:

The Year 11 course develops student’s knowledge, understanding and skills relevant to the study of motion, how
we describe it and what causes it. The course also examines energy in its different forms and how we describe
and measure electricity and magnetism and their interrelated effects.
The Year 12 course provides avenues for students to apply the concepts they were introduced to in Year 11 to
motion in two dimensions, electromagnetism, theories of light, the atom and the Universe.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course
Module 1: Kinematics
Module 2: Dynamics
Module 3: Waves and Thermodynamics
Module 4: Electricity and Magnetism
HSC Course
Module 5: Advanced Mechanics
Module 6: Electromagnetism
Module 7: The Nature of Light
Module 8: From the Universe to the Atom

Course Requirements:

Students are provided with 15 hours of course time for Depth Studies in both Year 11 and Year 12. During these
times students may undertake an investigation/activity that allows for the further development of one or more
scientific concepts.
A Depth Study may be one investigation/activity or a series of investigations/activities. Depth Studies may be
included in one module or across several modules.
Practical investigations are an essential part of the Year 11 and Year 12 courses and must occupy a minimum of
35 hours of course time each year.

Society & Culture (2 Unit)

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​Nil

Course Description:

Society and Culture develops knowledge, understanding, skills, values and attitudes essential to an
appreciation of the social world. How the interaction of persons, society, culture, environment and time shape
human behaviour is a central theme of study. Students develop an understanding of research methods and
undertake research in an area of particular interest to them. The research findings are presented for external
assessment in the Personal Interest Project (PIP). The course deals with areas of study of interest and
relevance to students.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course

  • The Social and Cultural World

Examining the core concepts of the course and a comparison of Australia’s life with distinctly different
cultures.

  • Personal and Social Identity:

Self Reflection – Why you are the person you are. Developing an understanding of the process of socialisation.
Through a cross-cultural comparison you will be able to reflect on the universality of concepts such as
adolescence.

  • Intercultural Communication:

How can we better understand and appreciate how people from another culture view their world?
HSC Course
Core

  • Social and Cultural Continuity and Change:

Through an in-depth study of a distinctly different country students will become familiar with the concepts of
continuity and change. Examining the social and cultural research methods.

  • The Personal Interest Project (PIP):

The investigation of a topic of students own choice connected to the Society and Culture course.
Depth Studies
A study of two of the following four depth studies:

  • Popular Culture
  • Belief Systems and Ideologies
  • Social Inclusion and Exclusion
  • Social Conformity and Non-conformity

Studies of Religion (2 Unit)

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course 240 Hours
Exclusions: ​Studies of Religion II

Course Description:

Studies of Religion II promotes an understanding and critical awareness of the nature and significance of
religion and the influence of belief systems and religious traditions on individuals and society, including an
emphasis on the Australian context.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course
Three foundation studies:

  • The nature of Religion and Beliefs
  • The influence of religion on Australian society from 1788 – 1945
  • Religions of Ancient Origin

Three Religious Tradition studies selected from:

  • Buddhism
  • Christianity
  • Hinduism
  • Islam
  • Judaism

HSC Course
Three foundation studies:

  • Aboriginal belief systems and spirituality and the influence of religion on Australian Society 1945 to
    the present
  • Religion & Peace
  • Religion & Non-Religion

Three Religious Depth studies selected from:

  • Buddhism
  • Christianity
  • Hinduism
  • Islam
  • Judaism

Visual Arts (2 Unit)

2 units of each of Preliminary and HSC Board Developed Course
Exclusions: ​ Nil

Course Description:

Visual Arts involves students in the practices of art making, art criticism and art history. Students develop
their own art making practices culminating in a ‘body of work’ in the HSC course. The art works reflect
students’ knowledge and understanding’ of technical and conceptual art making practices. Students critically
investigate works, critics, historians and artists from Australia as well as those from other cultures,
traditions and times within critical and historical studies.
The Preliminary course is broad, while the HSC course provides for deeper, increasingly more independent
investigations. While the course builds on Visual Arts courses in Stages 4 and 5, it also caters for students
with less experience in Visual Arts.

Course Content:

Preliminary Course

  • The nature of ​practice​ in art making, art criticism and art history through a range of investigations.
  • The role and function of artists, artworks, the world and audiences in the art world. And the
    relationship between these agencies, referred to as ​the conceptual framework ​in the Board of Studies
    syllabus​.
  • The frames, ​subjective, structural, cultural and postmodern perspectives through which artists, art
    historians and critics might develop and communicate their points of view.
  • The development of meaning, focus and interest in artwork.
  • Building understandings and skills over time through various investigations and working in a range of
    different forms.

HSC Course

  • Students develop their own informed points of view in increasingly more independent ways using ​the
    frames
  • Students develop their own​ practice of art making, art criticism, and art history applied to selected
    areas of interest.
  • Students learn about ​the conceptual framework​, the relationships between artist, artwork, world and
    audiences within the art world
  • Students develop further and deeper meaning and focus in their work, sustaining an informed point of
    view.

Particular course requirements:

Preliminary Course

  • Artworks in at least 2 forms and use of a process diary
  • A broad investigation of ideas in art criticism and art history

HSC Course

  • Development of a body of work and use of a process diary
  • A minimum of 5 Case Studies (4-10 hours each)
  • Deeper and more complex investigations of ideas in art criticism and art history.

Make an enquiry

Do you have a question ? We would love to hear from you.

ENQUIRE NOW

Book a Chat
or Tour

Connect with us

Connect with us via social media or subscribe to our newsletter